BiofilmBlast: Effective Cleaning Solution

BiofilmBlast is a cleaning solution formulated to remove biofilm buildup in various settings, such as hospitals, water systems, and industrial equipment. It helps prevent biofilm-related issues.
Category
Product
Where to get
Available commercially for industrial and institutional use.
Prepared by Shruti Sahoo, reviewed by Dr. Eugene Smith

BiofilmBlast FAQ


Image credit: biofilmblastmd.com

What is a biofilm and how does it work?

Biofilms are powerful communities of bacteria that function as a single entity with defences that can produce chronic and recurrent infections. Bacteria are protected within a matrix, surrounded by a defensive “slime” layer, called the Extracellular Polymeric Substance (EPS) that adheres to surfaces and forms biofilms.

What are examples of biofilms?

These are examples of biofilms, complex communities of microorganisms that live together in a self-produced matrix of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS). The microorganisms that form biofilms include bacteria, fungi, and protists.

What microorganisms form biofilm?

The microorganisms that form biofilms include bacteria, fungi, and protists. Perhaps the most common biofilm familiar to most is dental plaque — that sticky, colorless film of bacteria and sugars that constantly forms on our teeth. That slime that sometimes forms on the surface of water, particularly in ponds, is also biofilm.

Where do biofilms come from?

That slime that sometimes forms on the surface of water, particularly in ponds, is also biofilm. Actually, we’ve found biofilms almost anywhere; on minerals, metal surfaces, and inside our guts. In fact, biofilms have been around for at least 3.3 billion years. However, it’s in wet and moist environments that you’ll the most biofilms.

What is a biofilm?

A biofilm is a community of microorganisms embedded in a slimy, glue-like matrix that provides protection against the environment.

Where do biofilms form?

But biofilms form everywhere. For example, biofilms form on the hulls of ships and inside pipes where they cause severe problems ( de Carvalho 2007 ). On the other hand, in many natural settings, biofilm formation often allows mutualistic symbioses.

Which organisms produce biofilms?

Along with bacteria, biofilms are also generated by archaea and by a range of eukaryotic organisms, including fungi e.g. Cryptococcus laurentii and microalgae. Among microalgae, one of the main progenitors of biofilms are diatoms, which colonise both fresh and marine environments worldwide.

Which plasmid promotes biofilm formation?

Conjugative plasmids may encode biofilm-associated proteins, such as PtgA, PrgB, or PrgC which promote cell adhesion (required for early biofilm formation). Genes encoding type III fimbriae are found in pOLA52 ( Klebsiella pneumoniae plasmid) which promote conjugative-pilus-dependent biofilm formation.

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